Azure VM VNet to VNet Migration Script

Moving an Azure VM from one virtual network (VNet) to another VNet is not a new problem. If you find yourself having to do this just know it is a pain. Anyone that has faced the Vnet-to-Vnet VM Move conundrum before knows that moving a VM to another subnet is a trivial task and would think a VM move to another VNet would be the same. However, when it comes to moving a VM to a new VNet there is no supported way to do this from Microsoft and that is by design. There are some workarounds to moving a VM to a new VNet but in the end these boil down to redeploying the VM. When moving a VM to a new VNet you will need to plan for downtime.

In this blog post, I am not going to go through the steps of the workarounds for moving a VM to a new VNet. There are plenty of other blog posts out there covering how to do this manually or using ASR. If you want to read up on this there is one article I keep bookmarked by Microsoft MVP Tim Warner that you can find here. In this blog post, I am going to share and talk about a PowerShell script I pulled together to make the Vnet-to-Vnet VM Migration less painful by automating it. Download link is at the end of this blog post. I put together the script to work with PowerShell 5 using the AzureRM Module and one that works with PowerShell 7 (Core) using the AZ module.

Again, in general, the script is not moving the VM. The script is facilitating a migration of sorts by creating a new VM in new VNet while retaining the original VMs configuration and data disks. Here are the steps that are performed in the script:

(1) Gathers info on existing VM, VNet, and subnet.
(2) Removes the original VM while saving all data disks and VM info.
(3) Creates VM configuration for new VM, creates nic for new VM, and new availability set.
(4) Adds data disks to new VM, adds nics to new VM, adds VM to the new VNet.
(5) Creates new VM and adds the VM to the new VNet.

Let’s look at some other general information about the script. The script is a single script that has code for both PowerShell 5 using the AzureRM Module and PowerShell 7 (Core) using the AZ module. When you run the script it prompts you to choose what Azure module you are using. The script is interactive so it will prompt you to log in and prompt you for your Azure subscription in case you are running multiple subscriptions. The script is intended to migrate a single VM. It assumes the VM is deployed into an availability set and will migrate to a new availability set or in the existing availability set. You can also migrate to a new resource group or place the new VM in the existing resource group. Ok. Let’s dive into running the script. Here is a walk-through of running the script.

Open PowerShell and run Vnet-to-Vnet VM migration.ps1.

You will first be prompted for the following information:

Enter the Resource Group of the original VM:
Enter the original VM name:
Enter the new VM name:
Enter the new availability set name:
Enter the new VNet resource group:
Enter the new VNet name:
Enter the new Subnet name:

Next, you will be prompted to select your PowerShell version and Azure module as shown in the following screenshot.

The main differences between PowerShell 5 using the AzureRM Module and PowerShell 7 (Core) using the AZ module are the interactive login methods as well as cmdlets. Here are screenshots of the different logins.

PowerShell 5 with AzureRM Module:

A window will pop up for you to log into your Azure account.

Next a grid will pop up for you to select your subscription from the list.

PowerShell 7 (Core) with AZ module:

A warning will pop up prompting you with the device login info. To log into Azure go to https://microsoft.com/devicelogin and entering the code the warning gave you as shown in the screenshot.

List of your subscriptions will output. Go ahead and copy the subscription ID you plan to use. NOTE* Ignore this if you only have one subscription.

You are prompted to enter your subscription ID. This is to set the PowerShell session to the specified Azure subscription.  Again ignore this if you only have 1 subscription. Note if you leave it blank and click enter it will error. Even with the error, it will finish the rest of the script just fine.

Next in both PS 5 or PS 7 you will see the following prompt confirming that you want to remove the specified original VM. Confirm yes and press enter.

Virtual machine removal operation
This cmdlet will remove the specified virtual machine. Do you want to continue?
[Y] Yes [N] No [S] Suspend [?] Help (default is “Y”): Y

NOTE* the rest of the script will run. It will take a while so be patient. As it runs you should see some output similar to this:

OperationId : a4299a3f-ea34-4c22-ba71-f6cc42ebbdff
Status : Succeeded
StartTime : 9/9/2019 5:33:14 PM
EndTime : 9/9/2019 5:50:30 PM
Error :

||
||

WARNING: Since the VM is created using premium storage or managed disk, existing standard storage account, diagstwfyhhi3jyz54e, is used for boot diagnostics.
VERBOSE: Performing the operation “New” on target “VMMove012”.

When it is all said and done if it was successful you will see:

RequestId :
IsSuccessStatusCode : True
StatusCode : OK
ReasonPhrase : OK

That’s it. Now go into the Azure portal and you will see that your VM is moved to a new VNet and will have the data disks still. Check out the following screenshots for an example showing what the resource groups look like before and after the script runs.

Before

After

I have used this script and it has saved me time and avoid a headache. The goal is this will be useful for others as well. You can download the version of the script released with this blog post here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/VM-VNet-to-VNet-Migration-a7308ca2

If you want to contribute and enhance the script check it out on GitHub here: https://github.com/Buchatech/Azure-VM-VNet-to-VNet-Migration-Script

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Azure DevOps & Teams Integration = perfect match

 Recently Microsoft announced they have 13 million daily users in Teams outpacing Slack. You can read about this announcement here:  https://www.theverge.com/2019/7/11/20689143/microsoft-teams-active-daily-users-stats-slack-competition. There are many reasons Microsoft Teams has seen tremendous growth since its launch. I use Teams daily across all of my projects. In this post, I am going to write about one that has been exciting and useful for me. In this post, I am going to explore the integration with Microsoft Teams and Azure DevOps.

Are you working on Azure? If so, you are probably working with ARM Templates for Infrastructure as Code (IaC). Azure DevOps can help you centralize DevOps teams IaC ARM Templates. In addition, you will want to use VS Code and Microsoft Teams. There are many extensions in VS Code for ARM Templates. With Teams, you can integrate with Azure DevOps to track commits, pull requests, and even 2-way integration with Kanban boards.

Within Microsoft Teams you can add what is called “Apps”. These Apps are how you extend Teams and or integrate with other systems. This is how you integrate with Azure DevOps. Before we dive into this there are two important prereqs to note.

#1 You can only integrate a Teams channel with Azure DevOps when they both exist in the same Azure Active Directory tenant organization.

#2 Your Teams needs to be a part of an Office 365 account. The free version of Teams does have an Azure Pipelines app but does not have the Azure DevOps app that gives you full 2-way integration. The Azure Pipelines app is for notifications while the Azure DevOps app is for full collaboration.

Here are the high-level steps to integrate a Teams channel with the Azure DevOps App.

In your Teams channel go to Manage Team and then click on Apps.

Click on More Apps.

Search for Azure DevOps and click on it.

Input your Teams channel in the field next to Add to a team and then click on Install. This will load the Azure DevOps app into your teams’ channel. Note this needs to be done for each teams’ channel if you want this integration across multiple channels.

Next click the Set up button next to the feature you want to configure and use. The following screenshot shows the 3 features available. 

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Presenting on Azure Stack and Native Azure Management in June/July 2019

It has been a while since presenting on Azure Stack. On June 26th I will be presenting on “Azure Stack 101 in 45 minutes” at an Azure Virtual Day Camp for a D365 user group. Here is a link to the main site:

https://www.d365ug.com/participate/azure-virtual-day

Here is a direct link to my session:

https://azurevirtualdaycamp2019.sched.com/event/PTQE/azure-stack-101-in-45-minutes?iframe=no&w=100%&sidebar=yes&bg=no

In July I will be co-presenting with Kyle Weeks at the Minnesota Azure User Group on Azure Management. The session is titled “Scale Matters: Policy + Azure Management Groups”. Come check out this session if you want to go through what Azure Management Groups are, how they scale to any complexity and the best part… how to do this with policy configurations + Azure blueprints + RBAC. Here is a link to register for the meeting:

https://www.meetup.com/Minneapolis-Azure-Cloud-Computing-Meetup/events/dtbmtpyzkbgb/

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Enhance Azure ARM Template Authoring in VS Code

For anyone working with Azure sooner or later, you will end up authoring Azure Resource Manager (ARM) Templates. Working with ARM templates, in the beginning, can seem painful but once you get the hang of them it is a great way to build out and deploy your Azure as code. In this blog post, I am not going to go into detail on authoring ARM Templates. In this blog post, I am going to list out the extensions that I use in VS Code to enhance the ARM Template authoring experience. Recently whenever I am demoing or showing others my ARM Templates in VS Code they ask me how they can also make their VS Code look like mine when working with ARM Templates. I figured it makes sense to write up a blog about how I have my VS Code configured for ARM Templates.

If you are not using VS code, you should change that and start using it today! I use it pretty much for any scripting such as PowerShell, coding, any time I need a text editor and more. I even use it to work directly with Azure via cloud shell and to work with Docker containers and Kubernetes clusters. Here is a quick snapshot of what VS Code is for anyone not familiar with it. VS Code is an open source – code editor developed by Microsoft that is cross-platform able to run on Windows, Linux and macOS.​ At a high level here is what VS Code includes:

  • Has support for hundreds of languages.​
  • Has Integrated Terminal.​
  • Powerful developer tool with functionality, like IntelliSense code completion and debugging. ​
  • Includes syntax highlighting, bracket-matching, auto-indentation, box-selection, snippets, and more.​
  • Integrates with build and scripting tools to perform common tasks making everyday workflows faster. ​
  • Has support for Git to work with source control systems such as Azure DevOps, Bitbucket and more.​
  • Large Extension Marketplace of third-party extensions.​

As you can see there is a ton of stuff you can do with VS Code. VS Code is a must have for anyone doing CloudOps work with Azure and more. Now let’s look at the VS Code extensions I use for ARM Templates. I am including the link for each extension I will talk about. You can also simply load these right in VS Code.

Azure Resource Manager Tools:   https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=msazurermtools.azurerm-vscode-tools​

The Azure Resource Manager Tools extension provides language support for ARM Templates and language expressions. It can be used to create and edit Azure Resource Manager templates. ​High-level features include:

  • ARM Template Outline.​
  • IntelliSense.​
  • Support for built-in ARM functions, Parameter references, Variable references, resourceGroup() properties, subscription() properties, and more.
  • Bracket matching, Errors/Warnings and more.​

VS Code natively supports JSON. Azure Resource Manager Tools makes VS Code ARM Template aware. One of the biggest benefits it gives me is the ARM Template Outline making it much easier and faster to navigate the sections of an ARM Template. Here is what it looks like.

Next up is two extensions that both should be added. It is Material Theme and Material Theme Icons.

Material Theme –   https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=Equinusocio.vsc-material-theme

This extension gives you some very cool themes and works in combination with the Azure Resource Manager Tools extension to give you the new color coding of your ARM Template code. The color coding highlights different parts of the ARM Template code such as parameters, variables, functions and more making it much easier to read through all of the code in ARM templates. Here is an example:

Material Icons Themehttps://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=PKief.material-icon-theme

This extension adds a nice set of icons to your VS code. This extends beyond just ARM Templates. Again this makes it visually easier when navigating around VS code and ARM Templates. I typically use a PowerShell deployment script to deploy ARM Templates from VS Code into Azure. This icon them makes it easy to see ARM Template files and PowerShell files.

Here is a what it looks like without and with the Materials Icon Theme.

Without it:

With it:

ARM Snippets –  https://marketplace.visualstudio.com/items?itemName=samcogan.arm-snippets

The final extension I want to cover is ARM Snippets. This extension was developed by Sam Cogan (@samcogan) a fellow Microsoft MVP. In addition to the aforementioned marketplace link for this extension, you can find Sam’s Github repo for it here https://github.com/sam-cogan/arm-snippets-vscode.

This extension adds snippets to VS Code for creating Azure Resource Manager Templates. This is helpful when you are working in VS Code and need to add something to your template for example a parameter, resource etc. You simply type arm and a menu appears with a list of the available snippets. For example if you want to add a virtual machine you could type arm-vm and a list of Windows and Linux VM resources snippets will appear. Click on the one you want and it will add the code block for you. This makes authroing templates much-much faster. This is shown in the following screenshot:

​The snippets include:​

  • Skeleton ARM Template​ (Note: This will load a skeleton for a fresh new ARM Template.)
  • Windows and Linux Virtual Machines​
  • Azure Web Apps​
  • Azure Functions​
  • Azure SQL​
  • Virtual Networks, Subnets and NSG’s​
  • Keyvault​
  • Network Interfaces and IP’s​
  • Redis​
  • Application Insights​
  • DNS​
  • Virtual Machines​
  • And more……

Note that the ARM Snippets extension is derived from the Cross Platform Tooling Samples. The Cross Platform Tooling Samples are a set of templates, snippets, and scripts for creating and deploying Azure Resource Management Templates in cross-platform environments. It sounds like this is updated more often and worth looking into loading. It does not have a friendly installer though like the ARM Snippets extension does though. Here is the link to the Cross Platform Tooling Samples Github repo: https://github.com/Azure/azure-xplat-arm-tooling

End Result:

Below is a screenshot of what your ARM Templates will look like after loading all of the extensions mentioned in this blog post into your VS Code.

That wraps up this blog post. I hope this is helpful to those out there working with ARM Templates in VS Code. If you have any additional tips to share please add a comment. Happy authoring!

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Azure Blockchain Workbench Whitepaper

I recently read a Career Advice for IT professionals in 2019 article and was reminded again by a friend and fellow MVP’s on his blog that “Change is always constant in IT.

Part of being an IT professional is keeping an eye on and ramping up on new technology. Change in IT is constant and it is critical to explore new technology so you can bring innovation to your organization and ensure you are ready if the business decides they want to use a specific technology to gain an edge in the market.

With all the excitement around Blockchain, I decided to spend time ramping up on Azure’s Blockchain technology specifically Azure Blockchain Workbench. Azure Blockchain Workbench is a way for developers and IT pros to get A blockchain network up and running quickly.

Once Azure Blockchain Workbench is up and running IT pros can administrator the network and developers can dive right into building blockchain apps. Most people that have heard of blockchain are familiar with cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin. Most people don’t know of or associate blockchain with smart contracts. Azure Blockchain Workbench powers smart contract technology. A smart contract is a self-executing contract between two or more parties involved in a transaction. Getting started with Blockchain can seem intimidating but with Azure Blockchain Workbench it is not hard to get started. I wrote a white paper that you can use to get started and takes you beyond cryptocurrency into the world of smart contracts using Azure Blockchain Workbench.

The white paper covers the following:

  • Explorers blockchain beyond cryptocurrency
  • Has an in-depth overview of Ethereum and smart contracts
  • Helps identify when and what to use blockchain for?
  • The Azure Blockchain Workbench architecture
  • How to deploy Azure Blockchain Workbench
  • How to deploy a blockchain application

The Azure Blockchain white paper titled “Blockchain beyond cryptocurrency – A white paper on Azure Blockchain Workbench” can be downloaded here: https://gallery.technet.microsoft.com/Blockchain-beyond-b18066b9

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0 to 60 with Azure Blockchain Workbench

Almost every day when you go to a news website, a news program on the radio or news on the TV you can expect to hear some mention of Cryptocurrency and increasingly something about Blockchain.

Blockchain has a strong buzz and yet it is still misunderstood by many. It is an exciting time for technology and blockchain is one of the many reasons why. Blockchain is a public distributed digital ledger. Transactions between parties are processed in an efficient, verifiable and immutable way using cryptography. Transactions are tracked without a central entity such as a bank processing and keeping a record of the transactions. The ledger in a Blockchain is distributed across many nodes in the Blockchain network. Each time a transaction occurs the ledger is reconciled across all the nodes.

The Blockchain you typically hear about is related to some cryptocurrency such as Bitcoin, Litecoin, or Ripple. Blockchain goes way beyond this and is a technology that is being widely explored in use by some enterprises. Here are some examples of Blockchain in use within the enterprise. Microsoft’s Xbox uses Blockchain to deliver royalty statements to game publishers, FedEx uses Blockchain for storing shipping records, and 3M is using Blockchain for a new label-as-a-service concept. The commonality those examples is that they are using Blockchain smart contract technology.

A smart contract is a self-executing contract between two or more parties involved in a transaction. A smart contract holds each party in the transaction responsible without the need for a third-party authority. Smart contracts are essentially code running on top of a blockchain that are digitally facilitated, verified, and auto-enforced under the set of terms laid out within the contract.

Opposite of Blockchain used for cryptocurrency Blockchain used for smart contracts enable more complex scenarios beyond the exchange of digital currency. To illustrate an example of a Blockchain smart contract think about being able to buy and sell cars without a DMV processing the exchange of titles but instead the exchange of the title being verified and transferred digitally.

In today’s fast-moving world of technology, it is important to be able to take your solution from idea to MVP aka 0 to 60 as fast as possible. That is the goal of the Azure Blockchain Workbench (ABW). As shown in the following image with ABW you can literally go from idea>consortium blockchain network>code/use pre-built blockchain app>Blockchain app ready to use in a short amount of time.

 When I first started with Blockchain I was able to go from nothing to a fully functional Blockchain app in a couple of hours using ABW. As seen in the previous image ABW is made up of a combination of Azure services and capabilities. The main services include:

An App Service Plan with two web apps and two web APIs

An Application Insights instance

An Event Grid Topic

A couple of Key Vaults

A Service Bus Namespace

A SQL Server with a SQL Databases

A couple of Azure Storage accounts

Two Virtual Machine scale sets that consist of the ledger nodes and workbench microservices

A couple of virtual Network resource groups that contain Load Balancers, Network Security Groups, Public IP Address, and Virtual Network, VNet peering, and Subnets

Other components leveraged by ABW are Azure Active Directory for identity, Azure Monitor (optional), and log analytics workspace for logging (deployed with Azure Monitor), a mobile app for both iOS and Android along with a REST-based gateway service API to integrate to blockchain apps. Workbench provides the infrastructure needed to build and deploy blockchain applications so when you deploy ABW it includes everything you need. As of now ABW only supports Ethereum as its target blockchain. Microsoft has plans to add Hyperledger and Corda Blockchains in the future.

ABW is designed to make it easy for developers to bring Blockchain to the enterprise. ABW is deployed in the Azure Portal via a solution template. You can deploy Ethereum or attach to an existing one. After the Blockchain Workbench is deployed developers have the option to either create a Blockchain app or use one of the Applications and Smart Contract Samples from a repository maintained by Microsoft.

These Blockchain apps consist of a configuration metadata and smart contract. The configuration metadata file is in JSON format and determines the multi-party workflow the smart contract is in a language named Solidity and determines the business logic of the Blockchain application itself. The configuration and smart contract together make up the Blockchain application user experience. The Applications and Smart Contract Samples can be used as is to take Blockchain for a test run or can be modified to fit an organization’s specific need. As an example, some of the information you can modify with the configuration is application name, display name, state, and application roles.

As you can see it is relatively easy to get a Blockchain application up and going. Another real benefit to running a Blockchain application on Azure is the integration points with many of the other services available on Azure. Here are a few examples. ABW writes a copy of the Blockchains on-chain data from the Blockchain distributed ledgers to an off-chain SQL database. Developers can connect to this database to work with the Blockchain data for any number of scenarios one of them could be reporting in Power BI. The Workbench has a REST API, Service Bus, IoT Hub, and Event Grid that could be used for integration with other technology such as IoT devices, other systems, and Azure Streaming Analytics to further expand the possibilities. With the Blockchain workbench developers also have access to one of Azures automation tools called Logic Apps opening the door to a world of further automation scenarios.

There is much more to the Azure Blockchain Workbench then can be covered in a single blog. The main point of this post is to show how a developer can go from 0 to 60 within a short amount of time with minimal effort to stand up the scaffolding needed to support a Blockchain app. For a deeper dive into the Azure Workbench it is recommended to download my Blockchain Beyond Cryptocurrency whitepaper once it is released. Thanks for reading. To get started with the Azure Blockchain Workbench visit this link: https://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/features/blockchain-workbench

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Featured on Cloudskills.fm and New Azure course

FEATURED ON CLOUDSKILLS.FM ~

CloudSkills.fm is a podcast by fellow Microsoft MVP Mike Pfeiffer and veteran in the tech space with 5 books under his belt and numerous courses on Pluralsight. The podcast can be found here: cloudskills.fm. Mike is an all around good guy and I was honored to be a featured guest on one of his podcast episodes. The podcast is weekly with technical tips and career advice for people working in the cloud computing industry. The podcast is geared for developers, IT pros, those making move into cloud.

On this episode Mike and I talked about managing both the technical and non-technical aspects of your career in the cloud computing industry. We also discuss DevOps stuff around Docker, Azure Kubernetes Service, Terraform and cloud stuff around Azure management including my 5 points to success with cloud. You can listen to the podcast here:

https://cloudskills.fm/015

Also on you can listen here: iTunes: https://podcasts.apple.com/ca/podcast/cloudskills-fm/id1448194100 and PlayerFM: https://player.fm/series/cloudskillsfm/ep-015-managing-your-cloud-career .

NEW AZURE COURSE ~

I’m very excited Opsgility recently published a new Azure course by me titled: “Deploy and Configure Infrastructure”. This course is part of the AZ 300 certification learning path for Microsoft Azure Architect Technologies. More about the AZ 300 certification can be found here: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/learning/exam-az-300.aspx. The course is over 4 hours of Azure content!

Description of the course:

In the course learn how to analyze resource utilization and consumption, create and configure storage accounts, create and configure a VM for Windows and Linux, create connectivity between virtual networks, implement and manage virtual networking, manage Azure Active Directory, and implement and manage hybrid identities.

Objectives of the course:

  • Configure diagnostic settings on resources
  • Create baseline for resources
  • Utilize Log Search query functions
  • Configure network access to the storage account
  • Implement Azure storage replication
  • Configure high availability
  • Deploy and configure scale sets
  • Modify ARM Templates
  • Configure Azure Disk Encryption for VMs
  • Create and configure VNET peering
  • Install and configure Azure AD Connect

It can be watched here:

https://skillmeup.com/courses/player/deploy-and-configure-infrastructure

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Microsoft MVP Summit 2019

This year’s summit was one of the best MVP summits I have been to since being a Microsoft MVP! I focused on Azure, Azure Stack, containers, and orchestration platforms. That’s about all I can say about the summit. Everything else is NDA!

On top of all the learning at the summit it was great connecting with other MVP’s and the Microsoft teams. This I can share. Here are some highlights from the summit in pictures:

It was full of cool stickers starting off with one for the 2019 MVP Summit.

Here are a some of the core CDM MVPs in front of building 92 including Bob Cornelissen, John Joyner, Janaka Rangama, Jakob Svendsen, Sam Erskine, Cameron Fuller, Robert Hedblom, Dieter Wijckmans, and others.

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Deploy Rancher on Azure for Kubernetes Management

Lately I have been hearing a lot about a solution named Rancher in the Kubernetes space. Rancher is an open source Kubernetes Multi-Cluster Operations and Workload Management solution. You can learn more about Rancher here: https://www.rancher.com.

In short you can use Rancher to deploy and manage Kubernetes clusters deployed to Azure, AWS, GCP their managed Kubernetes offerings like GCE, EKS, AKS or even if you rolled your own. Rancher also integrates with a bunch of 3rd party solutions for things like authentication such as Active Directory, Azure Active Directory, Github, and Ping and logging solutions such as Splunk, Elasticsearch, or a Syslog endpoint.

Recently training opened up for some Rancher/Kubernetes/Docker training so I decided to go. The primary focus was on Rancher while also covering some good info on Docker and Kubernetes. This was really good training with a lot of hands on time, however there was one problem with the labs. The labs had instructions and setup scripts ready to go to run Rancher local on your laptop or on AWS via Terraform. There was nothing for Azure.

I ended up getting my Rancher environment running on Azure but it would have been nice to have some scripts or templates ready to go to spin up Rancher on Azure. I did find some ARM templates to spin up Rancher but they deployed an old version and it was not clear in the templates on where they could be updated to deploy the new version of Rancher. I decided to spend some time building out a couple of ARM templates that can be used to quickly deploy Rancher on Azure and add a Kubernetes host to Rancher. In the ARM template I pulled together it pulls the Rancher container from Docker Hub so it will always deploy the latest version. In this blog post I will spell out the steps to get your Rancher up and running in under 15 minutes.

First off you can find the ARM Templates here on my Github here: https://github.com/Buchatech/DeployRanchertoAzure.

The repository consists of ARM templates for deploying Rancher and a host VM for Kubernetes. NOTE: These templates are intended for labs to learn Rancher. They are not intended for use in production.

In the repo ARM Template #1 named RancherNode.JSON will deploy an Ubuntu VM with Docker and the latest version of Rancher (https://hub.docker.com/r/rancher/rancher) from Docker Hub. ARM Template #2 named RancherHost.JSON will deploy an Ubuntu VM with Docker to be used as a Kubernetes host in Rancher.

Node Deployment

Deploy the RancherNode.JSON ARM template to your Azure subscription through “Template Deployment” or other deployment method. You will be prompted for the following info shown in the screenshot:

Host Deployment

Deploy the RancherHost.JSON ARM template to your Azure subscription through “Template Deployment” or other deployment method. Note that that should deploy this into the same Resource Group that you deployed the Rancher Node ARM template into. You will be prompted for the following info shown in the screenshot:

After the Rancher Node and Rancher Host ARM templates are deployed you should see the following resources in the new Resource Group:

NameType
RancherVNet Virtual network
RancherHost Virtual machine
RancherNode Virtual machine
RancherHostPublicIP Public IP address
RancherNodePublicIP Public IP address
RancherHostNic Network interface
RancherNodeNic Network interface
RancherHost_OSDisk Disk
RancherNode_OSDisk Disk

Next navigate the Rancher portal in the web browser. The URL is the DNS name of the Rancher Node VM. You can find the DNS name by clicking on the Rancher Node VM in the Azure portal on the overview page. Here is an example of the URL:

https://ranchernode.centralus.cloudapp.azure.com

The Rancher portal will prompt you to set a password. This is shown in the following screenshot.

After setting the password the Rancher portal will prompt you for the correct Rancher Server URL. This will automatically be the Rancher Node VM DNS name. Click Save URL.

You will then be logged into the Rancher portal. You will see the cluster page. From here you will want to add a cluster. Doing this is how you add a new Kubernetes cluster to Rancher. In this post I will show you how to add a cluster to the Rancher Host VM. When it’s all said and done Rancher will have successfully deployed Kubernetes to the Rancher Host VM. Note that you could add a managed Kubernetes such as AKS but we won’t do that in this blog. I will save that for a future blog post!

Click on Add Cluster

Under “From my own existing nodes” Click on custom, give the cluster a name and click Next.

Next check all the boxes for the Node Options since all the roles will be on a single Kubernetes cluster. Copy the code shown at the bottom of the page, click done and run the code on the Rancher Host.

In order to run the code on the Rancher Host you need to SSH in and run it from there. To do this follow these steps:

  1. In the Azure Portal, from within the resource group click on the Rancher Host VM.
  2. On the Overview page click on Connect.
  3. Copy “ssh ranchuser@rancherhost.centralus.cloudapp.azure.com” from the Connect to virtual machine pop up screen.
  4. Open a terminal in either Azure cloud shell or with something like a terminal via VS Code and past the “ssh ranchuser@rancherhost.centralus.cloudapp.azure.com” in.

Running the code will look like this:

When done you can run Docker PS to see that the Rancher agent containers are running.

In the Rancher portal under clusters you will see the Rancher host being provisioned

The status will change as Kubernetes is deployed.

Once it’s done provisioning you will see your Kubernetes cluster as Active.

From here you can see a bunch of info about your new Kubernetes cluster. Also notice that you could even launch Kubectl right from hereand start running commands! Take some time to click around to see all the familiar stuff you are used to working with in Kubernetes. This is pretty cool and simplifies the management experience for Kubernetes. 

If you want to add more nodes or need the configuration code again just click the ellipsis button and edit.

In Edit Cluster you can change the cluster name, get and change settings and copy the code to add more VMs to the cluster.

That’s the end of this post. Thanks for reading. Check back for more Azure, Kubernetes, and Rancher blog posts.

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Require Many Tags on Resource Groups via Azure Policy

Azure Policy can be used to enforce rules and effects on resources in your Azure subscriptions. It is a part of the Azure Governance and management toolbox native to Azure. I actually wrote a blog post all about Azure Policy here as a part of my native cloud management in azure blog series.

In this blog post I want to dig into Requiring Tags on Resource Groups via Azure Policy. There is a sample policy ARM Template to accomplish this here:

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/azure/governance/policy/samples/enforce-tag-on-resource-groups . What is not clear with the this policy template is how to add an enforce additional tags within the single ARM Template. This is important as you don’t want to have multiple templates to enforce multiple tags.

Well its actually pretty straight forward. You need to add the additional tags as Rules and Parameters. For example:

{
"not": {
"field": "[concat('tags[',parameters('Environment'), ']')]",
"exists": "true"
}
},

and

"Environment": {
"type": "String",
"metadata": {
"description": "Provides information on what the resource group is used for (useful for maintenance, policy enforcement, chargeback, etc.) Tag value: Dev, QA, Stage, Test, Prod. Example: Prod"
}
},

Be sure you add a parameter for every rule. Also in the example I gave I removed the “equals”: “[parameters(‘tagValue’)]” from the rules because I did not want to populate the tag value. I simply needed to require the tag and leave the value open for the person creating the resource to fill in. Here is the full example Policy ARM Template here:

{
  "mode": "all",
  "policyRule": {
    "if": {
      "allOf": [
        {
          "field": "type",
          "equals": "Microsoft.Resources/subscriptions/resourceGroups"
        },
        {
          "not": {
            "field": "[concat('tags[',parameters('BillTo'), ']')]",
            "exists": "true"
          }
        },
        {
            "not": {
              "field": "[concat('tags[',parameters('Functional Area'), ']')]",
              "exists": "true"
            }
          },
          {
            "not": {
              "field": "[concat('tags[',parameters('Environment'), ']')]",
              "exists": "true"
            }
          },
          {
            "not": {
              "field": "[concat('tags[',parameters('AppOwner'), ']')]",
              "exists": "true"
            }
          }
      ]
    },
    "then": {
      "effect": "deny"
    }
  },
  "parameters": {
    "BillTo": {
      "type": "String",
      "metadata": {
        "description": "Provides a charge code or cost center to attribute the bill for the resources too. Tag value: Cost Center. Example: team@domain.com"
      }
    },
    "Functional Area": {
        "type": "String",
        "metadata": {
          "description": "Provides information on department or team is responsible for administering/supporting the application. Tag value: Team name/email. Example: 1506548"
        }
      },
      "Environment": {
        "type": "String",
        "metadata": {
          "description": "Provides information on what the resource group is used for (useful for maintenance, policy enforcement, chargeback, etc.) Tag value: Dev, QA, Stage, Test, Prod. Example: Prod"
        }
      },
      "AppOwner": {
        "type": "String",
        "metadata": {
          "description": "The Business app owner to contact. Tag value: Business App owners’ email. Example: name@domain.com"
        }
      }
  }
}

After you create the Policy definition using the ARM template it will look like this:

When you assign the policy you will need to complete the parameters:

The next time someone deploys a resource group without the required tags in the subscription this policy is assigned to it will fail.

Thanks for reading!

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